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What Are Your Favourite Scottish Words?

VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
edited July 2016 in Understanding Scotland
If someone asked you 'Wheres ma baffies?' would you know what they meant? I ask this because my cousin recently visited me and I asked him if he knew where ma baffies were! he looked at me as if I was speaking double dutch. I then explained that it was my slippers I was looking for. 

This got me thinking to what other Scottish words that I use regularly that folk might not know what I mean.
When visitors ask me about walks in the area I describe some as 'Sprauchley' as this is one of my favorite word to use as is 'Drookit', which I have been using quiet a bit recently :( 

We have some 'braw' words to describe things in Scotland and would love to learn some new words. And if there is a word you don't know what it means please ask. :) 
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Comments

  • johnmurrayjnrjohnmurrayjnr Member ✭✭✭
    When my now wife and I started dating, we visited my parents who had recently had a new carpet laid in the living room. Before  entering the room, my mum told us to take our 'shain aff'.
  • johnmurrayjnrjohnmurrayjnr Member ✭✭✭
    Tcheuchter is terrific too  :)
  • VisitScotlandJulieVisitScotlandJulie Member, Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    One my mum used a lot is "hummel doddies". That might be my favourite.

  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @VisitScotlandJulie I've never heard that one before, what does it mean? 
  • VisitScotlandJulieVisitScotlandJulie Member, Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @VisitScotlandNikkiR
    it's gloves!
    Usually the ones without fingers, I think.
  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
  • SoniaVRSoniaVR Member ✭✭
    Dreich comes quite handy here! I also like blether :)
  • CharlesCharles Member
    Skunner
  • ZubenelgenubiZubenelgenubi Member ✭✭
    I like glaikit!
    Awaiting arrival of witty signature.
  • IknowluxuryIknowluxury Member ✭✭

    Coorie-in : Snuggle in / Cuddle up

    Let’s all coorie-in an' keep the cold oot. 

  • FrauothemearnsFrauothemearns Member ✭✭
    Stop havering! (talking nonsense) :) 
  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @Frauothemearns I say that a lot to my teenage son!  :)
  • FrauothemearnsFrauothemearns Member ✭✭
    Also 'flit' (move house), bide (place of domicile, as in 'where do you bide?), quine (girl) and loon (boy) - think these are Doric, they are well used in Aberdeen that's for sure. 
  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @Frauothemearns I didn't know 'flit' was a Scottish word, thank you :) 
  • BushmanBushman Member ✭✭
    Glaur- mud. Some of the T in the park teenagers were covered in glaur thray heid tae fit. 
  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    My son says his favorite Scottish word to describe me, at times, is 'Crabbit'....   :D
  • VisitScotlandKimVisitScotlandKim Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @VisitScotlandBrian @Zubenelgenubi
    'Glaikit' gets my vote too!
  • johnmurrayjnrjohnmurrayjnr Member ✭✭✭
    "Gan Ben the house" :)
  • ZubenelgenubiZubenelgenubi Member ✭✭
    Hah forgot about our occasional use of ben. 
    Awaiting arrival of witty signature.
  • ScottieDollScottieDoll Member
    Not a favourite but 'breid' is a word that caused some in my family. It was at my grandparents, and Granda asked me to 'get oot the breid'. I looked in the cupboard but couldn't see any. I was looking for 'bread', he meant 'oatcakes'! Hubby and I have some friendly arguments about this; he maintains 'breid' is 'oatcakes' and 'loaf' is bread - I take a different view :)
  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @ScottieDoll I call it a 'loaf' but my friend always says 'bried' but we both say 'a piece' as in a 'piece an jam' :) 
  • VisitScotlandNikkiRVisitScotlandNikkiR Moderator, VisitScotland Staff
    @Samantha_Grant fantastic poem, I'm not sure I know all the all the words though! 
  • johnmurrayjnrjohnmurrayjnr Member ✭✭✭
    Yer on a shoogly peg there @visitScotlandsheena :smiley:
  • FishjaggerFishjagger Member ✭✭
    Aye!
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