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Gaelic versus Scots !?

mustseescotlandmustseescotland VisitScotland Contributor ✭✭
edited April 2016 in Understanding Scotland

I see VS have launched the second part of its Gaelic Language Plan. While this is great - I always feel the Scots language is neglected. As I live in the heartland of Scots (Moray in the NE of Scotland) - I hear it spoken every day in shops and out and about. My husband and mother-in-law are native speakers. Scots is one of three languages spoken in Scotland. It is so rich and diverse - and covers many parts of Scotland - you may only regard it as a dialect - but it is really a rich language - More about it here www.scotslanguage.com

Gilbert (from Fraserburgh) wrote these two articles on Scottish accent and Scottish words - you may enjoy!

Have any of you heard Scots on your travels?




The Scotland guide, written by Gilbert and Johanna Summers - lifetime Scottish tourism experts, so you get the best vacation.
www.must-see-scotland.com



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Comments

  • Samantha_GrantSamantha_Grant VisitScotland Ambassador ✭✭✭✭
    I'm strongly passionate about the Scots language having studied Scots literature and history at university. I try to keep the old words alive and have taught and encouraged my daughter to use them. In my childhood Scots was commonly spoken in Edinburgh where I'm from. I've seen its use decline over the years but that may be more down to the social circles I now move in rather than the decline of the language. It's so beautifully expressive - words like puggled, drookit, maukit, blether never fail to make me smile.  I think it's less prevalent in the middle and upper classes due to the fact it was once considered by many to be slang and not deemed a proper way to speak. My husband is from Nairn and uses far fewer Scots words than I do. Nairn has an interesting history as the High Street once had a Gaelic speaking end and a Scots speaking end. Possibly his ancestors were Gaelic speakers. I'm teaching him how to speak like a Scot now.
    I'm a Scottish travel blogger and freelance writer with an extensive knowledge of travelling in Scotland.  I'm always on the road exploring my wonderful country.  I love remote places, history and the great outdoors. 




  • mustseescotlandmustseescotland VisitScotland Contributor ✭✭
    edited June 2016
    Totally agree with you Samantha_Grant - I grew up in Edinburgh but my grandfather was a Scots speaker from Dumfries and my Granny grew up in Arisaig with Gaelic-speaking parents - so I heard many varied words from both languages. But only at home - my Edinburgh school never acknowledged the existence of Scots. I now live near Buckie where the Scots language is alive and well you'll be glad to hear! My husband is from Fraserburgh so I am immersed in Scots. When he was at school the teachers would punish the kids for speaking Scots ("slang" as you say!) - but give out prizes for the best recitation of the poetry of Robert Burns - so, go-figure as the young people say!!  You might enjoy our articles on Scottish words and the Scots language. (oh - sorry - I see I mentioned them before.. well, I am passionate about our languages!)


    The Scotland guide, written by Gilbert and Johanna Summers - lifetime Scottish tourism experts, so you get the best vacation.
    www.must-see-scotland.com



  • Robin_Fae_UnstRobin_Fae_Unst Member ✭✭
    I speak Shetland Dialect and I am passionate about keeping it alive - so sad when you see parents diluting their dialect in front of their kids. The Shetland Dialect has bits and pieces of Scots but much of it is the remnants of Norn (Shetland & Orkney's variation of Old Norse) which was spoken here until the end of the 19th century. 
    I have to say I can't understand a lot of Scots but then I am sure most Scots speakers wouldn't be able to understand me if I spoke broad Shetland too! 
    From the island above all others, Unst is Britain's northern most island.
    Shetland is an amazing and unique location to visit and all of us Shetlanders are eager to share our wonderful little part of the world with everyone, so come along & visit us. 
    Join me on my underwater explorations of Shetland at my instagram @rdmouatt ;
  • FofomaFofoma Member ✭✭✭
    I'm another fan of speaking Scots and use it and try to pass it on to my Granddaughters. In fact I've taught my Welsh husband many words that he now uses. Lol 
  • I love that we live in a country where there are so many languages and dialects. Lets hope we can keep them all alive!  

    Check out the tinberry travels - sharing stories, adventures and travel related nonsense as I explore the world bit by bit

    Find me on twitter & instagram

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